Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-14

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

Eat for Health

137. The purpose of food and nutrition is good health.

Getting on Well

138. People think that one gets on well only when one wins a lottery or does good business. However, if one contemplates natural phenomena and purify one’s mind, one gets on very well indeed.

139. It is not that one has happiness if one is in a good position materially; it is only when one has less desire and anger that one attains happiness.

A Good Turn

140. If you do a good turn, you will naturally get thanks.

Indulgence

141. You should enjoy pleasures only for a limited portion of your leisure time.

142. If you are in for serious work, no work is as easy as eating and drinking.

Bad Signs

143. If courts, places of entertainment, and liquor shops are crowded it is a bad sign.

Be Mindful

144. Bad thoughts occur spontaneously. Good thoughts occur only when the mind is alert; it is always good to be alert.

Taking Pride

145. People take pride in what they did when young. If they cannot take such pride, they take pride on being elderly.

 

Foolishness

146. “All men are fools” is a saying that encourages people to do more foolish acts.

Perseverance

147. In doing any work, first, you must have general knowledge; second, you must be mentally active; third, you must discriminate between right and wrong, finally, you must have perseverance.

 

 

 

 

___ www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-4

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-5

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-6

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-7

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-8

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-9

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-10

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-11

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-12

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-13

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (11) The Innocent Monk

 

Introduction

THE BUDDHIST CANON, otherwise known as the Tipitaka, is the collection of the entire teachings of the Buddha. From out of this vast collection, inspirational verses which touch the essence of what the Buddha taught were compiled and recorded in a book called DHAMMAPADA. These verses, arranged under twenty-six chapters with such headings as the Wise, Mindfulness, and Happiness are part of the earliest extant records of words uttered by the Buddha himself.

There are 423 verses in the Dhammapada, and behind each one of them is a story which bears a lesson of great moral value whether they concern such human flaws as pride and greed, or such virtues as compassion and generosity. It is primarily for this reason that for centuries throughout Southeast Asia, the Dhammapada stories have been used by parents to instruct and entertain their children and have been recounted by monks to inspire and enlighten those who came to seek their guidance.

As to whether the stories are really based on historical fact or merely the products of vividly imaginative minds, discussion still goes on, but it is evident that the stories may not be entirely precise in detail nor free from exaggeration. One is nevertheless advised to keep an open mind in order to be able to appreciate the moral lessons the stories are trying to convey. In any case, even those who do doubt their authenticity would have to agree that the lessons they teach provide food for reflection which may consequently give a whole new direction to the way one thinks and lives. Moreover, because the Buddha always suited his teachings to the age, temperament, character, and mental state of his listeners, one may just be able to identify with any of the characters that are depicted in the Dhammapada stories and benefit from that identification.

In addition, the Dhammapada stories are a valuable source of information regarding the personality of the Buddha himself: his temperament—the Buddha was always calm, patient and compassionate (no instance can be cited where the Buddha ever displayed any anger or spoke harshly); his great humility—he accepted food even from lowly servants and slaves, sometimes food that had already been partially eaten; his wisdom and skill in teaching—he was able to uproot the deep-seated unwholesome attitudes of even his most abusive and stubborn accusers and bring them to accept Right View.

“It is impossible to estimate how many human beings have refrained from telling a lie, killing an insect, spreading a rumor, or taking what is not given, by calling to mind a story from the Dhammapada at the right moment. If the world has experienced moments of compassion and wisdom in the face of greed, hatred, and delusion, the Dhammapada must be given its due share of credit for it.”

No doubt the Dhammapada will continue to be a source of inspiration and edification to all who seek spiritual upliftment within its pages.

I do believe you all would be able to extract morale of these stories and get moral benefits from these; then my efforts wouldn’t be in vain!

The Innocent Monk

ONCE THERE WAS A GEM POLISHER whose family offered alms-food to a certain monk every day. One morning as the monk was entering their house to accept his alms-food, a messenger from the king’s palace arrived with a giant ruby for the gem polisher to work on. As the gem polisher had been in the kitchen handling some raw meat when the messenger arrived, the stone was wet with blood when he put it on a table before going into the kitchen to get some food for the monk. Their pet bird, in the meantime, thinking that the blood-stained ruby was something to eat, picked it up and swallowed it before the monk could prevent it from doing so.

When the gem polisher came back into the room, he immediately noticed that the ruby was gone. He asked his wife and son, and then the monk, if they had taken it, but they all said no. The gem polisher assumed it must have been the monk since he was the last one seen in the room with the ruby. He decided to beat the truth out of the monk, but his wife, would not let him do it. She warned him that the consequences of causing harm to a noble one would be worse than the punishment he could possibly receive from the king.

The gem polisher, however, was too furious to listen to his wife. He tied up the monk and beat him severely until blood started flowing from his head. Attracted by the sight of the blood, the curious bird flew toward the monk, where it received a stray blow and fell dead. Only then, did the monk tell the gem polisher that it was the bird that had swallowed the ruby.

The gem polisher quickly cut open the bird and found that the monk was indeed telling him the truth. Realizing his mistake, he trembled with fear and pleaded for the monk’s forgiveness. The monk replied that he felt no ill-will toward him for it was a debt that had to be repaid due to mistakes in his past lives. The monk then succumbed to his wounds and died, passing away into Parinibbana since he was already an arahat. When the gem polisher himself died, he was reborn in hell. As for his wife, she was reborn in one of the deva worlds.

 

Morale of The Story

“Some are reborn as human beings, the wicked are reborn in hell, the righteous are reborn in heaven, and those free from defilements pass away into Nibbana.”
                                                                                                                                     {Verse 126}

Doc Version Here In My Group:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/buddhism-for-beginners/title-dhammapada-stories-11-the-innocent-monk/1529595753763874/

___ http://www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (1) The Lady & The Ogress

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (2) The Cruel Butcher

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (3) The Scholar Monk & The Arahat

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (4) Mindfulness Means Life

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (5) The Wandering Mind

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (6) The Fickle-Minded Monk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (7) The Monk Whose Body Stunk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (8) The Cure For Death

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (9) Bilalapadaka, The Selfish Rich Man

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (10) The Wise Merchant

 

Title- The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom E-book

Title- Treasury of Truth-The Illustrated Dhammapada E-book

Title- Suttanta Pitaka-Khuddaka Nikaya-The Dhammapada Translated E-book

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (10) The Wise Merchant

 

Introduction

THE BUDDHIST CANON, otherwise known as the Tipitaka, is the collection of the entire teachings of the Buddha. From out of this vast collection, inspirational verses which touch the essence of what the Buddha taught were compiled and recorded in a book called DHAMMAPADA. These verses, arranged under twenty-six chapters with such headings as the Wise, Mindfulness, and Happiness are part of the earliest extant records of words uttered by the Buddha himself.

There are 423 verses in the Dhammapada, and behind each one of them is a story which bears a lesson of great moral value whether they concern such human flaws as pride and greed, or such virtues as compassion and generosity. It is primarily for this reason that for centuries throughout Southeast Asia, the Dhammapada stories have been used by parents to instruct and entertain their children and have been recounted by monks to inspire and enlighten those who came to seek their guidance.

As to whether the stories are really based on historical fact or merely the products of vividly imaginative minds, discussion still goes on, but it is evident that the stories may not be entirely precise in detail nor free from exaggeration. One is nevertheless advised to keep an open mind in order to be able to appreciate the moral lessons the stories are trying to convey. In any case, even those who do doubt their authenticity would have to agree that the lessons they teach provide food for reflection which may consequently give a whole new direction to the way one thinks and lives. Moreover, because the Buddha always suited his teachings to the age, temperament, character, and mental state of his listeners, one may just be able to identify with any of the characters that are depicted in the Dhammapada stories and benefit from that identification.

In addition, the Dhammapada stories are a valuable source of information regarding the personality of the Buddha himself: his temperament—the Buddha was always calm, patient and compassionate (no instance can be cited where the Buddha ever displayed any anger or spoke harshly); his great humility—he accepted food even from lowly servants and slaves, sometimes food that had already been partially eaten; his wisdom and skill in teaching—he was able to uproot the deep-seated unwholesome attitudes of even his most abusive and stubborn accusers and bring them to accept Right View.

“It is impossible to estimate how many human beings have refrained from telling a lie, killing an insect, spreading a rumor, or taking what is not given, by calling to mind a story from the Dhammapada at the right moment. If the world has experienced moments of compassion and wisdom in the face of greed, hatred, and delusion, the Dhammapada must be given its due share of credit for it.”

No doubt the Dhammapada will continue to be a source of inspiration and edification to all who seek spiritual upliftment within its pages.

I do believe you all would be able to extract morale of these stories and get moral benefits from these; then my efforts wouldn’t be in vain!

The Wise Merchant

ONCE THERE WAS A PROSPEROUS MERCHANT who did not mind travelling long distances in order to deliver his merchandise to faithful buyers. Robbers got a wind of this and soon were trying to capture his carts loaded with fine and expensive goods. The merchant, however, was a clever man and each time succeeded in thwarting their plans.

On one of his journeys, the merchant learned that some monks were going to be travelling in the same direction, so he invited them to accompany him and promised to look after their every need along the way. No one was aware at the time, however, that some robbers had already heard of the merchant’s trip and planned to ambush his caravan as it passed through a certain forest.

The wise merchant, in the meantime, made wary by past experiences, suspected something was amiss as they approached the forest. So instead of entering it, he decided
to set up camp just outside its edge and stay there for a few days. Later, when he learned what the robbers were up to, he decided that for the safety of his travelling companions
and his goods, it would be best to abort the trip and return home.

When news of this reached the ears of the robbers, they went and lay in wait for the merchant on the road back to the city. But the wise merchant also had his own scouts who came back and warned him of the robbers’ strategy. The merchant then decided to stay in a village where he had good friends and not budge for a few more days.

Upon hearing about the merchant’s new plan, the monks decided to cut short their trip and return to their monastery. When they arrived there, they told the Buddha how their
trip was complicated by robbers who aimed at looting the merchant’s caravan and how the wise merchant outsmarted them each time.

 

The Buddha replied by telling them that the merchant was a wise man, for he evaded a journey beset with robbers like someone who did not want to die evaded poison. In the
same way, the Buddha taught, a wise person who realizes that existence is like a journey beset with dangers, does his best to keep away from doing evil.

 

 

Morale of The Story

“Just as a wealthy merchant with few attendants avoids a dangerous road, or just as one who desires to go on living avoids poison, even so should one shun evil.”
                                                                                                                                     {Verse 123}

Doc Version Here In My Group:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/buddhism-for-beginners/title-dhammapada-stories-10-the-wise-merchant/1528341213889328/

___ http://www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (1) The Lady & The Ogress

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (2) The Cruel Butcher

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (3) The Scholar Monk & The Arahat

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (4) Mindfulness Means Life

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (5) The Wandering Mind

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (6) The Fickle-Minded Monk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (7) The Monk Whose Body Stunk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (8) The Cure For Death

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (9) Bilalapadaka, The Selfish Rich Man

 

Title- The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom E-book

Title- Treasury of Truth-The Illustrated Dhammapada E-book

Title- Suttanta Pitaka-Khuddaka Nikaya-The Dhammapada Translated E-book

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (9) Bilalapadaka, The Selfish Rich Man

 

Introduction

THE BUDDHIST CANON, otherwise known as the Tipitaka, is the collection of the entire teachings of the Buddha. From out of this vast collection, inspirational verses which touch the essence of what the Buddha taught were compiled and recorded in a book called DHAMMAPADA. These verses, arranged under twenty-six chapters with such headings as the Wise, Mindfulness, and Happiness are part of the earliest extant records of words uttered by the Buddha himself.

There are 423 verses in the Dhammapada, and behind each one of them is a story which bears a lesson of great moral value whether they concern such human flaws as pride and greed, or such virtues as compassion and generosity. It is primarily for this reason that for centuries throughout Southeast Asia, the Dhammapada stories have been used by parents to instruct and entertain their children and have been recounted by monks to inspire and enlighten those who came to seek their guidance.

As to whether the stories are really based on historical fact or merely the products of vividly imaginative minds, discussion still goes on, but it is evident that the stories may not be entirely precise in detail nor free from exaggeration. One is nevertheless advised to keep an open mind in order to be able to appreciate the moral lessons the stories are trying to convey. In any case, even those who do doubt their authenticity would have to agree that the lessons they teach provide food for reflection which may consequently give a whole new direction to the way one thinks and lives. Moreover, because the Buddha always suited his teachings to the age, temperament, character, and mental state of his listeners, one may just be able to identify with any of the characters that are depicted in the Dhammapada stories and benefit from that identification.

In addition, the Dhammapada stories are a valuable source of information regarding the personality of the Buddha himself: his temperament—the Buddha was always calm, patient and compassionate (no instance can be cited where the Buddha ever displayed any anger or spoke harshly); his great humility—he accepted food even from lowly servants and slaves, sometimes food that had already been partially eaten; his wisdom and skill in teaching—he was able to uproot the deep-seated unwholesome attitudes of even his most abusive and stubborn accusers and bring them to accept Right View.

“It is impossible to estimate how many human beings have refrained from telling a lie, killing an insect, spreading a rumor, or taking what is not given, by calling to mind a story from the Dhammapada at the right moment. If the world has experienced moments of compassion and wisdom in the face of greed, hatred, and delusion, the Dhammapada must be given its due share of credit for it.”

No doubt the Dhammapada will continue to be a source of inspiration and edification to all who seek spiritual upliftment within its pages.

I do believe you all would be able to extract morale of these stories and get moral benefits from these; then my efforts wouldn’t be in vain!

Bilalapadaka, The Selfish Rich Man

ONE OF THE MEN in Bilalapadaka’s neighborhood liked to do charitable deeds. One day, he arranged to have the Buddha and his disciples over to his house for a meal. Being a generous person, he wished to give everyone a chance to share the joy and merit of giving and so invited all of his neighbors to join in, even the rich but selfish Bilalapadaka.

The day before the merit-making event was to take place, the promoter of charity bustled from house to house, happily collecting whatever food his neighbors wished to contribute toward the meal.

Bilalapadaka, upon seeing his neighbor going around for donations, softly cursed under his breath, “What a miserable fellow! Why did he invite so many bhikkhus if he could not afford to provide for them properly by himself? Now he has to go around begging!”

When his neighbor came to his door, Bilalapadaka donated only a little salt, honey, and butter, which although gladly accepted, were kept separately from what the others had already given. The rich man was confused and wondered why his contribution was purposely kept aside. He thought maybe his neighbor intended to humiliate him by showing everyone how little a man of so much had offered. So he sent one of his servants to investigate.

Back at his house, the man took the things that Bilalapadaka had donated and divided them among the pots of rice, curries, and sweetmeats in order to enhance their flavor. When the servant reported this to Bilalapadaka, Bilalapadaka still doubted his neighbor’s true intention. So the next day he went to his house with a dagger hidden under his cloak and planned to kill his neighbor should he utter even a single word that would put him to shame.

 

But the man practising charity said to the Buddha, “Venerable Sir, the alms-food is not offered to you by me alone but with the help of many others in the neighborhood. Small or large, each contribution was given in faith and generosity, so may we all gain equal merit.”

 

Bilalapadaka became ashamed when he heard what his generous neighbor said to the Buddha, for he realized then what a great mistake he had committed. He went and asked his neighbor to forgive him.

 

When the Buddha heard Bilalapadaka’s words of remorse and learned the reason for them, he said to the people assembled there, “No matter how small a good deed you may get to do, don’t think that it is not important, for if you habitually do small deeds, in the long run they will become big ones.”

Morale of The Story

“Do not think lightly of doing good, saying`A little will not affect me.’ just as a water jar is filled up by falling rain, drop by drop, the wise one is filled up with merit by accumulating it little by little.”
                                                                                                                                     {Verse 122}

Doc Version Here In My Group:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/buddhism-for-beginners/title-dhammapada-stories-9-bilalapadaka-the-selfish-rich-man/1527210007335782/

___ http://www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (1) The Lady & The Ogress

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (2) The Cruel Butcher

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (3) The Scholar Monk & The Arahat

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (4) Mindfulness Means Life

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (5) The Wandering Mind

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (6) The Fickle-Minded Monk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (7) The Monk Whose Body Stunk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (8) The Cure For Death

 

Title- The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom E-book

Title- Treasury of Truth-The Illustrated Dhammapada E-book

Title- Suttanta Pitaka-Khuddaka Nikaya-The Dhammapada Translated E-book

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (8) The Cure For Death

 

Introduction

THE BUDDHIST CANON, otherwise known as the Tipitaka, is the collection of the entire teachings of the Buddha. From out of this vast collection, inspirational verses which touch the essence of what the Buddha taught were compiled and recorded in a book called DHAMMAPADA. These verses, arranged under twenty-six chapters with such headings as the Wise, Mindfulness, and Happiness are part of the earliest extant records of words uttered by the Buddha himself.

There are 423 verses in the Dhammapada, and behind each one of them is a story which bears a lesson of great moral value whether they concern such human flaws as pride and greed, or such virtues as compassion and generosity. It is primarily for this reason that for centuries throughout Southeast Asia, the Dhammapada stories have been used by parents to instruct and entertain their children and have been recounted by monks to inspire and enlighten those who came to seek their guidance.

As to whether the stories are really based on historical fact or merely the products of vividly imaginative minds, discussion still goes on, but it is evident that the stories may not be entirely precise in detail nor free from exaggeration. One is nevertheless advised to keep an open mind in order to be able to appreciate the moral lessons the stories are trying to convey. In any case, even those who do doubt their authenticity would have to agree that the lessons they teach provide food for reflection which may consequently give a whole new direction to the way one thinks and lives. Moreover, because the Buddha always suited his teachings to the age, temperament, character, and mental state of his listeners, one may just be able to identify with any of the characters that are depicted in the Dhammapada stories and benefit from that identification.

In addition, the Dhammapada stories are a valuable source of information regarding the personality of the Buddha himself: his temperament—the Buddha was always calm, patient and compassionate (no instance can be cited where the Buddha ever displayed any anger or spoke harshly); his great humility—he accepted food even from lowly servants and slaves, sometimes food that had already been partially eaten; his wisdom and skill in teaching—he was able to uproot the deep-seated unwholesome attitudes of even his most abusive and stubborn accusers and bring them to accept Right View.

“It is impossible to estimate how many human beings have refrained from telling a lie, killing an insect, spreading a rumor, or taking what is not given, by calling to mind a story from the Dhammapada at the right moment. If the world has experienced moments of compassion and wisdom in the face of greed, hatred, and delusion, the Dhammapada must be given its due share of credit for it.”

No doubt the Dhammapada will continue to be a source of inspiration and edification to all who seek spiritual upliftment within its pages.

I do believe you all would be able to extract morale of these stories and get moral benefits from these; then my efforts wouldn’t be in vain!

The Cure for Death

SOON AFTER GISA KOTAMI got married, she gave birth to a son whom she loved dearly. Then, one day, when he was just beginning to learn how to walk, he suddenly fell ill and died. This left Gisa Kotami deeply grieved. Unable to accept her only son’s death, she roamed the streets with him held tightly in her arms, asking whomever she came across for some medicine that could cure her son and bring him back to life. Luckily she came upon a kindly man who realized her plight and advised her to go and see the Buddha. “The Buddha alone,” he told her, “has the antidote to death.”

When the Buddha saw Gisa Kotami, he realized that she was too grief-stricken to listen to reason and so resorted to some skillful means to help her. He told her that he could indeed restore her son back to life if she could get him a mustard seed. “However,” the Buddha warned, “the mustard seed must not come from any household where death has ever occurred. If you can bring one back to me, your child will live again.”

Gisa Kotami felt great relief and was overjoyed at the prospect of having her son once more playing at her side. Full of hope, she hurriedly went from house to house, but nowhere could she find a household in which no one had ever died. At last it dawned on her that she was not alone in her grief, for everyone else had suffered the loss of a loved one at one time or another. When she realized that, she lost all attachment to the dead body of her son and understood what the Buddha was trying to teach her: nothing born can ever escape death.

Gisa Kotami then buried her son and went to tell the Buddha that she could find no family where tears had never been shed over a lost loved one. The Buddha said to her, “You have now seen that it is not only you who have ever lost a son, Gisa Kotami. Death comes to all beings, for fleeting and impermanent is the nature of all component things.”

Gisa Kotami then became a nun and strove hard to eventually perceive the state of no death and no sorrow, which is the deathless state of Nibbana.

Morale of The Story

“Better it is to live one day comprehending the Deathless than a hundred years without ever comprehending the Deathless.”
                                                                                                                                     {Verse 114}

Doc Version Here In My Group:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/buddhism-for-beginners/title-dhammapada-stories-8-the-cure-for-death/1526237287433054/

___ http://www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (1) The Lady & The Ogress

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (2) The Cruel Butcher

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (3) The Scholar Monk & The Arahat

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (4) Mindfulness Means Life

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (5) The Wandering Mind

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (6) The Fickle-Minded Monk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (7) The Monk Whose Body Stunk

 

Title- The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom E-book

Title- Treasury of Truth-The Illustrated Dhammapada E-book

Title- Suttanta Pitaka-Khuddaka Nikaya-The Dhammapada Translated E-book