Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-26

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

Purify Your Mind

261. If your ear is clean, you will hear better. If your eye is clear, you will see better. If your mind is pure, you will understand better.

Well Done

262. We Buddhists offer food on birthdays, and when a man dies his relatives offer alms-food on his behalf. That’s just fine! We Buddhists are alright! We have done well!

 

 

Well-being

263. Well-being includes joy (pīti), happiness (somanassa), and bliss (sukha).

For the Good of Others

264. A noble and pure person is one who sacrifices his interests for the good of others. He has to reduce his greed and ill-will.

Seek the Best Profit

265. People work to live a happy and comfortable life. If making a living causes physical and mental misery, the purpose of working will not be achieved. People should seek a pursuit which makes for less physical discomfort and more happiness. If earning a living in this existence leads to rebirth in Hell it will be most regretable.

A Leader Must Go Straight

266. The leading bull must go straight, or the following cattle will fall victim to the tiger. If the abbot goes up to the loft, the novice will climb on the roof of the monastery.

 

Give and Take

267. Buddhist monks shouldn’t be only on the side of taking; they should also give. What are they to give? They should give education to children, preach the Dhamma to the laity, and contribute their efforts to the welfare of the country.

 

 

Life Goes On

268. Life is not static; it is always moving. We are all going on a journey. So we should know where we come from and where we are going.

 

 

Abandon Greed

269. Misery is always the result of passion and greed. More greed, more misery; less greed, less misery. Those who have attained perfection (the Arahants) do not have the slightest greed, so they are free from misery.

 

 

The Hook is Baited

270. If you are obsessed by sensual pleasures, you will suffer like a fish that has swallowed the angler’s hook.

___ www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-4

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-5

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-6

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-7

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-8

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-9

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-10

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-11

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-12

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-13

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-14

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-15

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-16

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-17

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-18

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-19

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-20

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-21

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-22

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-23

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-24

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-25

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book

Advertisements

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-25

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

Prestige is Not Important

251. Gaining prestige is not important. Maintaining the prestige already gained is more important. Prestige is gained by right conduct, but sometimes it is gained by wrong means.

Morality is Better Than Charity

252. You are gradually approaching the end of this life and a transfer to the next existence. It is better to have high morality than charity for the next life. If you have sufficient store of morality, you can be happy in your next life even if you don’t have much charity. It is best to observe eight precepts with right livelihood as the eighth, which is observed by good people.

 

Ājīvamaṭṭhaka sīla = abstaining from: 1) killing, 2) stealing, 3) sexual misconduct,
4) lying, 5) slandering, 6) abusive speech, 7) idle chatter, 8) wrong livelihood (dealing
in alcohol, weapons, living beings, etc.)

Go From Strength to Strength

253. Merit cannot be obtained without really trying. You must work hard to earn merit. The confidence in Dhamma you have now should be used to cultivate more confidence. The diligence that you use now will augment the diligence you will have in the future.

Contentment

254. The Buddha said that contentment is the greatest treasure. In olden days people lived on frugal meals, wore home-woven cloths, and yet were happy and contented. Happiness does not result from wealth, only from contentment.

Enthusiasm

255. You must practise the Dhamma enthusiastically. If you are listless, the practice will be boring. You cannot succeed unless you are enthusiastic and active.

A Good Teacher

256. A teacher must be able to gauge the ability of his pupils. Some of them are more intelligent than the teacher. However, there will be confusion if the teacher is not efficient.

257. A teacher must live by high moral standards or he cannot admonish his pupils. If a teacher has defective morality he will never be able to guide and instruct his pupils.

258. First, you must be well-behaved. Then only can you make others well-behaved.

Greed

259. Greed should be allowed within limits. One can be allowed to have desire for one’s food, clothing, and shelter, but once desire exceeds a reasonable limit it cannot be controlled.

260. In giving charity, if you hanker for popularity and prestige, and desire celestial realms in your next existence, then all these desires are motivated by greed.

___ www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-4

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-5

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-6

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-7

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-8

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-9

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-10

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-11

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-12

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-13

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-14

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-15

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-16

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-17

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-18

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-19

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-20

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-21

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-22

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-23

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-24

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (28) The Great Pretenders

 

Introduction

THE BUDDHIST CANON, otherwise known as the Tipitaka, is the collection of the entire teachings of the Buddha. From out of this vast collection, inspirational verses which touch the essence of what the Buddha taught were compiled and recorded in a book called DHAMMAPADA. These verses, arranged under twenty-six chapters with such headings as the Wise, Mindfulness, and Happiness are part of the earliest extant records of words uttered by the Buddha himself.

There are 423 verses in the Dhammapada, and behind each one of them is a story which bears a lesson of great moral value whether they concern such human flaws as pride and greed, or such virtues as compassion and generosity. It is primarily for this reason that for centuries throughout Southeast Asia, the Dhammapada stories have been used by parents to instruct and entertain their children and have been recounted by monks to inspire and enlighten those who came to seek their guidance.

As to whether the stories are really based on historical fact or merely the products of vividly imaginative minds, discussion still goes on, but it is evident that the stories may not be entirely precise in detail nor free from exaggeration. One is nevertheless advised to keep an open mind in order to be able to appreciate the moral lessons the stories are trying to convey. In any case, even those who do doubt their authenticity would have to agree that the lessons they teach provide food for reflection which may consequently give a whole new direction to the way one thinks and lives. Moreover, because the Buddha always suited his teachings to the age, temperament, character, and mental state of his listeners, one may just be able to identify with any of the characters that are depicted in the Dhammapada stories and benefit from that identification.

In addition, the Dhammapada stories are a valuable source of information regarding the personality of the Buddha himself: his temperament—the Buddha was always calm, patient and compassionate (no instance can be cited where the Buddha ever displayed any anger or spoke harshly); his great humility—he accepted food even from lowly servants and slaves, sometimes food that had already been partially eaten; his wisdom and skill in teaching—he was able to uproot the deep-seated unwholesome attitudes of even his most abusive and stubborn accusers and bring them to accept Right View.

“It is impossible to estimate how many human beings have refrained from telling a lie, killing an insect, spreading a rumor, or taking what is not given, by calling to mind a story from the Dhammapada at the right moment. If the world has experienced moments of compassion and wisdom in the face of greed, hatred, and delusion, the Dhammapada must be given its due share of credit for it.”

No doubt the Dhammapada will continue to be a source of inspiration and edification to all who seek spiritual upliftment within its pages.

I do believe you all would be able to extract morale of these stories and get moral benefits from these; then my efforts wouldn’t be in vain!

The Great Pretenders

ONCE THERE WAS A TIME of great hardship in the country and the monks who were spending the vassa near a poor village found themselves with very little lay support.

 

In order to get enough food, the bhikkhus addressed each other in such a way that the people in the village, never suspecting that they would be deceived by monks, believed that they had attained sainthood. And as the news of them spread, they gained even more respect. So the villagers, although themselves struggling to survive, managed to pool together enough food to keep their “saints” well-fed and comfortable.

 

When the vassa came to a close and all the bhikkhus who had spent their vassa away from the Buddha went back to pay their respects to him, as was the custom, the well-fed bhikkhus stood out like a sore thumb. Everyone else looked so thin and pale next to them.

 

 

The Buddha asked the healthy bhikkhus how they had managed to do so well when the other monks could barely get by. The bhikkhus, expecting praise for their cleverness, recounted how they had misled the poor villagers into believing that they were saints. “And are you really saints?” the Buddha asked them, knowing full well that they were not. When they admitted that they were not, the Buddha warned them that to accept requisites from lay supporters, if they did not truly merit them, was indeed very unwholesome action and should be refrained from.

 

 

 

Morale of The Story

“It is better for one to eat a red hot lump of iron burning like a flame than to eat alms-food offered by the pious if one is without morality and unrestrained in thought, word, and deed.”
                                                                                                                                     {Verse 308}

Doc Version Here In My Group:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/buddhism-for-beginners/title-dhammapada-stories-28-the-great-pretenders/1584409304949185/

___ http://www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (1) The Lady & The Ogress

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (2) The Cruel Butcher

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (3) The Scholar Monk & The Arahat

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (4) Mindfulness Means Life

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (5) The Wandering Mind

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (6) The Fickle-Minded Monk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (7) The Monk Whose Body Stunk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (8) The Cure For Death

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (9) Bilalapadaka, The Selfish Rich Man

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (10) The Wise Merchant

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (11) The Innocent Monk

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (12) The Unfortunate Hunter

 

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (13) Kamma Is Inescapable

 

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (14) The Self-Pampered Monk

 

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (15) Bhikkhu Or Brahmana?

 

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (16) Not Even For Free

 

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (17) Practise What You Preach

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (18) The Impermanence of Beauty

 

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (19) The Pregnant Bhikkhuni

 

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (20) The Power of Loving Kindness

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (21) The Necklace of Fingers

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (22) The Cloth Baby

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (23) The Diligent Do Not Sleep

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (24) Sainthood On Top of A Pole

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (25) Almsfood Is Almsfood

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (26) The Abusive Brothers

 

Title- Dhammapada Stories- (27) The Ungrateful Sons

 

Title- The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom E-book

Title- Treasury of Truth-The Illustrated Dhammapada E-book

Title- Suttanta Pitaka-Khuddaka Nikaya-The Dhammapada Translated E-book

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-24

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

Gratitude

241. If there is no religion and no culture, there will be no gratitude; then human society will degenerate completely.

 

Patch Up Your Own Boat

242. If you can patch up another’s boat and cannot patch up your own, you will be drowned in midstream.

243. Never mind others’ faults; know your own.

 

Envy

244. The stupid person envies the clever one; the inferior man is jealous of the man in a superior position. Such attitudes stem from malice.

 

 

A Long Journey

245. The round of rebirths is the physical and moral journey to nibbāna. It is a long one. If you take a long view, you will no longer regard anything as strange. To have the wisdom for continuing on the journey steadily is important. Never mind the transient events of just one existence, look to the destination of the journey — nibbāna.

246. The journey is long; Travellers are fools;
The food has gone rotten; Companions are bad.
Interference of passions leads one to hell,
where once there, escape is difficult.
Meaning: The round of rebirths is a long journey and those taking the road are foolish. The food that they carry for the journey such as pride, prestige, charity, morality, and meditation, have gone rotten. Their constant companion is craving, so when they go down to Hell the chances of redemption are remote since craving cannot be eradicated.

 

 

True Love

247. However much parents say that they love their children, they do not really love them if they fail to give them a good education. If they neglect their children’s health, their love is not genuine.

 

 

Children Are Treasures

248. Children are treasures. Sons and daughters are born to adorn the world. They could do a great service to the entire world and to the Buddha’s dispensation.

 

 

Building Character

249. Character building should begin early in life. You cannot learn to build good character when you are advanced in age. It is hard to change old habits. Nowadays, people like cinemas, so Burmese children are becoming more like foreigners than true Burmese.

 

Do Good to Those Who Hate You

250. One cannot travel through saṃsāra alone. One needs others to help one make progress. Our Buddha had the villainous Devadatta who formerly murdered the Bodhisatta when he was the hermit Khantivādī, and again when he was Prince Dhammapāla. It would be good to have good associates. You must do no harm to those around you. If they ill-treat you, it is for you to treat them well.

 

___ www.facebook.com/groups/buddhismforbeginners ___

Related Articles:

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-4

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-5

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-6

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-7

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-8

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-9

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-10

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-11

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-12

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-13

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-14

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-15

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-16

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-17

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-18

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-19

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-20

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-21

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-22

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-23

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book