Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-6

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

The Upper Classes

51. If one looks from the upper class, one can see the lower class; if, on the other hand, one looks up from below one cannot possibly see the upper area.

The Lower Classes

52. When people reach the upper classes, they regard lower class people with contempt; while those in the lower classes usually have envy and jealousy.

The Lower Realms

53. In this universe there is a hell, and the animal kingdom, ghosts, fools, and poor people. All will die one day. Be careful!

A Kind of Arrogance

54. People say that a person is arrogant if he wears a stern face, shouts at people, spurns them, or being power-drunk, doesn’t care to behave politely. I don’t mean that kind of arrogance. What I mean is that you should be high-minded about your
status as you wander through saṃsāra.

World Leaders

55. Look at those whom people call world leaders. Scientists invent new and deadly weapons. Capitalists buy these weapons. Those in power never stop giving orders to kill.

The Peace Keepers?

56. The stupid leaders of the world expect to get peace only through war. That’s why they are reinforcing their armies with men and hardware while talking glibly of peace.

Under A False Pretext

57. If you commit a sin under the pretext that it is a traditional
practice, it is still a sin.

Women Are Clever

58. In the human world, women are very clever. If there were no women in the world, life would be cold and dreary. It would be difficult even for the Bodhisatta to appear on the scene.

 

Mothers Should Work Hard

59. Children remain idle because parents are busy. To ensure that their children are good and clever, mothers should work at least as hard as their men.

 

Pointing the Finger

60. People are in the habit of pointing their fingers at others. They do not point at themselves. If they point at others, they point with just one finger while the other four are pointing at themselves.

61. Don’t speak ill of others in their absence; don’t condemn them
in their presence; don’t be hasty to blame them.

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Related Articles:

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-4

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-5

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-5

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

Adore the Buddha

41. Focus your adoration on the Buddha; it is like living with the Buddha.

42. If you deeply adore the Buddha, you will faithfully follow his admonition.

43. Contemplation of the attributes of the Buddha will make the devotee powerful, intellectually developed, and influential. So you should contemplate the attributes of the Buddha and visualise the Buddha as still living.

44. Radiate loving-kindness to all beings while adoring the Buddha. The person who does this will have a better destiny. So always radiate loving-kindness.

The Best Person in the World

45. If anyone asked me “Who is the greatest person in the world?” I would say, “The Buddha.”

Subtract Ignorance and Craving

46. From an existence subtract ignorance and craving; then there will be no more rebirths.

Do-It-Yourself

47. If you can help yourself, do not give trouble to others causing them to make bad kamma.

Fame and Wealth Are Nothing

48. Fame and wealth are, after all, nothing. When you die you have to depend on morality, concentration, and wisdom.

National Solidarity

49. Interracial marriages are necessary for national solidarity among Upper Burma, Lower Burma, Hill Tribes, and Plains people.

Give As Good As You Get

50. If someone offers you one pound, you must do something worth two.

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Related Articles:

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-4

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-4

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

A Bad Motive

32. If one speaks and acts with a bad motive, all one’s speech and acts will be just as bad.

To Be Outstanding

33. If you want to stand out from the common people, do not do
what they are doing.

34. Truly good people still exist in the world. They are noble, intelligent, and courageous.

The Key Position

35. Human existence is the key position; you can work for moral
purity to achieve celestial existences and even nibbāna.

Humans and Animals

36. Naturally, human beings have more benefit from good deeds
than animals, and in doing bad deeds too, they surpass animals.

Face Up to Suffering

37. If you are afraid of suffering, face up to it.

38. Happiness does not beget more happiness. We can achieve it
only by facing up to suffering.

What Kind of Person Am I?

39. What kind of person am I? I ought to be one for whom I would have a high opinion. I can lie to others but I cannot lie to myself. Everybody should try to become worthy of high self-esteem.

Take the Long Way

40. If you take the long way, the Buddha’s word will not be in vain.
Take the long way as long as you can. Take long to practise the
Dhamma.

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Related Articles:

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book

Title- Daily Buddhist Devotions By Ven. Dr. K. Sri Dhammananda E-book

▶ The Need for Daily Buddhist Devotions

 

With the growing interest in the Buddha, Dhamma in recent years there is an increasing need for a manual of Buddhist texts that could be used to introduce newcomers to the basic tenets of Buddhism and the traditional Buddhist practices expressing reverence and devotion to the Blessed One.

This small manual shows how homage to the Triple Gem -the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha -can be performed. It is hoped that this manual will be of much general use. It can be used to guide parents in the responsible task of leading their children along the correct spiritual path.

Every Buddhist should learn to recite at least a few verses or stanzas from this manual when he or she visits the temple, kneels before the home altar, or when in need of spiritual solace. Many Buddhists feel lost at what to do or recite when they attend a religious function. Although they say they are Buddhists, they often find Buddhist customs and practices strange. They have kept themselves away from Buddhism in preference for the materialistic way of life.

 

The main cause of delinquency is parental neglect. With this manual in their hands, parents can no longer blame the lack of suitable devotional material to teach their children properly.

On many occasions when a couple visits the temple, the husband or wife enters the shrine alone to pay homage to the Buddha while the other spouse stands outside the shrine as if he or she belongs to another religion. But when asked, it is found that both in fact profess the same religion. This clearly shows that they were not trained properly in their religious practices by their parents when they were young.

 

Such an attitude should be changed. Parents must learn the value of religious instruction to train their children to live as good Buddhists and to perform their religious duties and obligations. The lack of religious training and understanding account for the reluctance to enter or even embarrassment some people might have upon entering the shrine room.

Some only remember the Buddha and the temple when they are stricken with illness or when they are in trouble; very often as a last resort. Such should not be the attitude of Buddhists. Those who remember the Buddha daily will receive blessings for protection and will gain more self-confidence in their day-to-day activities in leading a peaceful life. Buddhism is not a mere philosophy or psychology for people to talk about. The devotional aspect of Buddhism is important for one to gain spiritual solace.

 

In Buddhist countries there are many facilities available such as temples, monasteries, Dhamma classes for children, Buddhist schools and numerous Buddhist publications. This manual of Buddhist devotions is offered as a door to the commodious mansion of Buddhism with many chambers of culture, civilization and the arts as well as a vast storehouse of spiritual truth. The door is necessary but doors alone serve no purpose. It is only when we realise and practise the great truths that lie beyond those doors that we can benefit from the Buddha’s Teachings.

To practising Buddhists, this manual provides the daily guide for practice that leads to purification at three levels: Sila, purification of conduct through right speech and action; Samadhi, purifi-cation of mind through meditation; and Parana, purification of understanding through insight.

 

This small manual contains verses in homage to the Triple Gem to develop faith and devotion, as well as strengthen our commitment towards good conduct to develop a pure mind. It also contains Paritta verses which could be recited to ward off evil forces and to overcome them through positive mental action. In addition, the verses in this manual could be recited for meditation and the cultivation of insight of the true nature of existence.

▶ Why Take Refuge in the Buddha

 

Those who believe in God would pray to him for help and protection when they experience fear, sorrow or disturbances. Many Buddhists ask whom could they turn to when confronted with the thoughts of fear, insecurity and helplessness. Under such circumstances, we can turn our minds to the Buddha and seek solace through him.

When Buddhists visualize the supreme qualities of the Buddha, His great victories serenity and sacredness, and His calm demeanour, their minds will be calmed and their confidence will grow. It is through calming their minds and focusing on this power that they are in a position to understand the nature of the disturbances and find the means to overcome their worldly suffering. Even in many religions, God is not regarded as a person, but a force which is personified in the mind. By praying, their minds undergo the same process and the answer to their problem will become evident, as if by a miracle.

Many of our problems are caused by the mind itself. Therefore, the mind alone is able to solve them through proper understanding. When the mind is properly settled by constantly thinking of the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha, it can help us to overcome our sense of helplessness, fear of evil spirits, and loneliness. As a result, self-confidence is restored. This, in short, is what is meant by taking ‘refuge’ in the Buddha.

 

Contents

 

III The Pali Alphabet / Pronunciation of Letters
IX Introduction The Need for Daily Buddhist Devotions
XV Acknowledgement
XVII The Value of Paritta Suttas

 

 

 

 

⌘ Paying Homage

23 Vandana/Salutation to the Buddha
25 Ti-Sarana/ Taking the Three Refuges
37 Tiratana Vandana /Verses for Paying Homage to the Tripe Gem, Buddha,Dhamma and Sangha
40 Nava Guna Gatha/ Nine Great Virtues of the Buddha.
47 Atthavisati Buddha Vandami/Salutation to the Twenty-Eight Buddhas
53 Bodhi Vandana /Salutation to the Bodhi Tree
65 Cetiya Vandana/ Salutation to the Three Main Objects of Veneration Precepts
29 Panca Sila / The Five Precepts
33 Atthanga Sila / The Eight Precepts

 

 

 

⌘ Offerings

57′ Puja / Offerings of Light, Flowers, Food, Medicinal Drinks and Perfumed Smoke

 

 

⌘ Transference of Merits 

68 To make Devas Participate in Merits
69 Transference of Merits to the Departed

 

 

⌘ Aspiration 

71 Patthana /Aspiration or Wish

 

 

⌘ Forgiveness 

75 Khamatha me Bhante/Forgiveness of Short-comings

 

 

⌘ Invitation to Devas 

87 Aradhana /Invitation to Devas

 

 

⌘ Recital of Suttas for Various Kinds of Blessing 

79 Jaya Mangala Gatha/Stanzas of victory Recital for Blessings and Prosperity on significant occasions
93 Mangan Sutta / Discourse on Blessings Recital for Blessings on auspicious occasions
101 Ratana Sutta / Discourse on The Jewels Recitals to avert Evil Forces
127 Metta Sutta/Discourse on Loving-kindness (Goodwill) Recital to radiate boundless Loving-kindness to relieve others’ suffering
133 Maha Jaya Mangala Gatha/ Stanzas of Great Victory Recital for Blessings and Protection

139 Jinapanjara / The Buddha’s Mansion Recital” to overcome Sickness and Disturbances
149 Jaya Paritta/Recital for Invoking Victory
157 Angulimala Paritta/ Recital to Bless Expectant Mothers for Easy Childbirth
113 Morning Recitals in Place of Prayer
116 A short Recital in Place of Prayer for Blessing and protection at Any Time
120 Morning Recitals
123 Evening Recitals

 

 

⌘ Recitals for Reflection on the Occasion of funeral & Meditation at Any Time 

161 Buddhanussati/Meditation on the Buddha Recital for Self-composure suitable for meditation at any time
167 Mettanussati/Meditation on loving-kindness
173 Marananussati/Meditation on Death
177 Asubhanussati/Meditation on the Loathsomeness of the Body
181 Salla Sutta/The Shaft of Grief

 

⌘ How to remember the Departed 

189 Tirokudda Sutta /Departed Ones in Spirit Form Recital to Transfer Merits to Departed Ones

 

 

⌘ Meditation 

195 Tilakkhana/Meditation on the Three Characteristics
197 Piyehi Vippayogo/Reflection on the Loss of Loved Ones
201 Jivitam Aniyatam, Maranam Niyatam/Life is uncertain,Death is certain, Impermanency of Life Recital for during Funerals

205 Attha Maha Sanvega Vatthu/Recollection of Eight Sorrowful Stages of Life

 

 

⌘ Sharing of Merits

209 Punnanumodana / Sharing of Merits with Others

 

 

⌘ Taking Refuges 

221 Saranatta-Mupemi/Verses for Taking Refuge in the Triple Gem Racital at the end of Religious Functions
215 Narasiha Gatha/ Lion of Men Princess Yasodhara’s pointing out of the Unique Physical Characteristics of the Buddha to her Son, Rahula who met Him for the first time

 

 

 

 

 

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Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-3

 

The late Sayādaw U Janakābhivaṃsa, also known as Mahāgandhayon Sayādaw, devoted his life to teaching Buddhist studies (pariyatti) to many hundreds of monks. In Burma the fame of his monastery is perhaps comparable to that of Oxford University in England, and many young monks wish to go there to study. He followed the vinaya very strictly, and worked tirelessly for the preservation of the sāsana.

 

Can You See Misery?

21. If you can see the misery of the present existence, you will want no more existences.

Annihilationism

22. It is owing to the doctrine that death is the end of things that immorality flourishes in the world.

This Useless World

23. In this useless world, where there are only useless people living useless lives, do you think there will be any improvement without reason. If there is any good in the world, it is due to good morals without which nothing good can possibly result.

Competition

24. Competition is not always good. Competition can ruin the world.

Where is There Equality?

25. In this world there is luxury in one place, famine in another,
war in yet another. Is there any such thing as equality?

26. Men are equal but there is no equality in talent and ability.

For Their Own Benefit

27. People readily ask others to do things for their own benefit,
but are reluctant to help others.

28. People look to their own welfare; they are reluctant to do good for others.

29. If you don’t work for others’ interests, you won’t have any
benefit for yourself.

Getting the Better of Others

30. People have the habit of getting the better of others, and
scorning and condemning them.

31. If you get the better of another, people will side with you, but if they get the better of you, they will change sides. That’s natural.

 

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Related Articles:

 

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-1

 

Title- Venerable Mahagandhayon Sayadaw’s Homily Part-2

 

Title- Buddhist Wisdom- The Aphorisms of Mahagandhayon Sayadaw E-book